In order to create a better, modern government we need to challenge the status quo, often through innovative methods that require learning through failure. Innovation is a unique field in which failure is an expected and positive force. When you fail, you learn your limits and can actively adapt your innovation to enable best success. When you bias toward experimentation, you:

  • Use quick, low-barrier experiments to test assumptions, fail in small increments, and incorporate insights to make a better end product or service.
  • Approach problems with a growth-mindset and stay flexible, improve and learn continuously.
  • Questions to Ask

    • Who are the change makers in your organization?
    • How do people currently obtain the product or service and are there ways to improve their experience?
    • How can we ‘experiment’ when program cycles are lengthy and limited by statute?
    • Which solutions could be implemented to improve the user experience?
    • What are the minimal changes required for each potential solution to be effectively tested?
    • Did the minimal changes make a positive, neutral, or negative impact?
    • If the tested solution did not make a positive impact, which other solutions could you test?
    • How much testing can you do before determining that the product is failing as is?
    • If the product is failing, how can you pivot?
    • Checklist

      • Understand the different ways people obtain the service.
      • Identify key barriers to adopting changes within your organization.
      • Identify mechanisms for quick, low-risk experiments.
      • Assess the product for areas needing improvement.
      • Consider which changes could improve the user experience.
      • Take minimal steps to implement each solution.
      • Test the product again to determine whether the solution was beneficial. If so, repeat the above.
      • If not, try another solution.
      • If several solutions do not improve the product, pivot.